Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis

Operculum of the larynx

In addition to these three cartilages of the larynx there is another, [cartilago epiglottica] (figs. 12, 13; L in figs. 3-6, 11 in ch. 21 Bk. 2), soft and in substance quite similar to the upper part of the third cartilage, 19 which quite elegantly forms the covering of the larynx, precisely keeping any food or drink from running down into the larynx. This covering of the larynx arises from a wide and anteriorly curved base (a in figs. 12 and 13), starting from the inner region of the scutiform [cartilago thyroidea] next to its higher part; proceeding hence inwards (b in the same figs.), it takes the shape of a triangle 20 whose base is formed by the beginning of the operculum [petiolus epiglottidis] from the scutiform [thyroid] cartilage, or its connection [by the ligamentum thyro-epiglotticum] with that cartilage. The apex of the triangle is that part which is drawn inside as if to the region of the gullet. Where this body faces the palate, it is bulging and softer; but where it rests on the larynx it is hollow and concave, and much harder than on its upper part. In its extremity, where it faces the gullet, it is remarkably soft, and overlaid by a fatty membrane [tunica mucosa], somewhat recalling the nature of a ligament; 21 where it is joined to the scutiform cartilage, there is also a great deal of fat 22 , and it does not look as hard there as in its middle.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis