Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis

Where the nature of the rough artery will be thoroughly described

Although the sixth book is to be devoted to the heart and the organs of respiration and will deal extensively with the nature of the rough artery [trachea] (all of figs. 1 and 2; H, I, K, L, M, M in the figure for ch. 4, Bk. 9), at this point its cartilages come up for discussion, so that we may sum up in this book all the parts by which the body is supported, and so that we will not be delayed from the account of the muscles in the following book by the omission of bones and cartilages here. In the sixth book we shall explain how the rough artery is brought down from the pharynx into the thoracic cavity and spread out by a multiple growth of branches [bronchi] into the lungs [pulmones], so as to bring them air and take it out again. Not only shall we depict this as an instrument of respiration, but we shall also declare that it is the principal organ of the voice and then explain in exact detail the nature of its substance. It is composed in part of cartilages, in part of membraneous vincula and simple membranes or tunicae, and finally of muscles peculiar to its own head.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis