Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis

Index of the thirteen figures which are set forth here in order, and their characters.

The first of these figures, marked 3, shows the first cartilage [cartilago thyroidea] of the larynx from the right side; because it resembles a shield we shall also call it the shield-shaped (scutiform). The figure which is fourth in order displays the inner or posterior face of the same cartilage. In the fifth is drawn the same cartilage in the outer or anterior face. The sixth represents the anterior face of the second cartilage [cartilago cricoidea] of the larynx. The seventh has the second cartilage of the larynx shown from the right side. The eighth presents the second cartilage of the larynx depicted from the posterior face. In the ninth is drawn the third cartilage [cartilago arytenoidea] of the larynx from the right side. 1 In the tenth appears the anterior aspect of the third cartilage. The eleventh illustrates the same cartilage in its posterior face. The twelfth shows the lower [dorsal] surface of the operculum [epiglottis] of the larynx, where the operculum faces the cavity of the larynx. The thirteenth has the superior [ventral] surface of the operculum of the larynx, which faces the palate. The fourteenth offers to view from the anterior or external face one cartilage [c. trachealis] of the trunk of the rough artery [trachea], built like the letter C. The fifteenth displays the same cartilage in its posterior surface, which looks toward the inner cavity of the rough artery.

A, B 3, 4, 5 The two higher processes [cornua superiora] of the shield-shaped cartilage [c. thyroidea].
C, D 3, 4, 5 The two lower processes [cornua inferiora] of the same cartilage.
E, F in 8 , but only E in 7 Areas of the second cartilage [facies articularis thyroidea] with which the lower processes of the shield-shaped cartilage unite.
G, H 3, 4, 5 At this point the shield-shaped cartilage is seen at its narrowest and shortest, now and again showing the line 2 which separates the right portion [lamina dextra] of the cartilage from the left [lamina sinistra] as if they were two cartilages.
I 6, 7 At these points is seen the area [cavitas infraglottica] of the second cartilage facing the inner mass of the larynx. The remaining parts which are seen in these three figures constitute the outer region or mass of the larynx.
K, L 6, 7 The lower part of the second cartilage, forming a complete circle. K marks the anterior region [arcus cartilaginis cricoideae] of this part, which can be felt beneath the shield-shaped cartilage. L indicates the posterior region of this lower part, brought downward like a process, and marked L in the eighth figure.
M 7, 8 Spine-like line [crista mediana] standing out in the posterior region of the second cartilage. 3
N, O 8 Depressions in the posterior part [lamina cartilaginis cricoideae] of the second cartilage, carved at the sides of the line marked M.
P, Q 6, 7, 8 Two tubercules or heads [facies articulares arytenoideae] of the second cartilage, entering the depressions [basis cartilaginis arytenoideae] of the third cartilage.
R, S 9, 10, 11 Two parts [apices] of the third cartilage [cartilago arytenoidea]. 4
T 9, 10, 11 This region [incisura interarytenoidea] of the third cartilage is empty, occupied only by the membraneous ligaments and tunics [tunica mucosa] of the larynx.
V, X 9, 10, 11 Surfaces [facies articularis] of the third cartilage by which it is articulated to the second cartilage.
Y,Y 9, 10 Processes [processus vocalis] of the third cartilage which form the lingula [rima glottidis] of the larynx.
Z 9, 10, 11 Region 5 of the third cartilage resembling that part of jugs or vases from which we pour water for those washing the hands.
a 12, 13 Base of the operculum [cartilago epiglottica] 6 of the larynx which is connected to the shield-like cartilage of the larynx.


page 153

b 12, 13 Apex or region of the operculum of the larynx proceeding farthest back and to the inside, toward the spine. In addition to the fifteen figures just explained, the figures to be placed at the beginning of the twenty-first chapter of the second book, in which the muscles of the larynx will be explained, are relevant to this discussion. Among the other figures, you will inspect the last three no less appropriately than if they were placed here: those in which the picture of the lingula [rima glottidis] or fissure of the larynx is drawn as accurately as possible.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 38 On the Cartilages of the Rough Artery, and What Therein Would Be Called by the Greeks Glottis and Epiglottis