Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula

The outer malleolus

This lowest part of the fibula [fibula, malleolus lateralis], attached to the talus, is convex on its outer side and covered by absolutely no part of a muscle (e in the 1st table of muscles, C in the 2nd, and ϕ 36 in the skeletons); it constitutes the outer malleolus, which Galen attests is, like the inner malleolus, wrongly called the talus by certain persons. 37 This error has run down all the way to us. Not to mention others, our own Erasmus of Rotterdam in his Colloquy De talorum lusu 38 agrees with Pliny 39 that the malleoli in humans are called tali: which so pleased many translators of Galen that they have constantly translated sfura/, i.e. the malleoli, as tali. The outer side of the outer malleolus is convex and unfleshed, like the inner side of the inner malleolus [malleolus medialis]. 40 The posterior surface of the outer malleolus [malleolus lateralis] shows a large depression (q in figs. 2, 6) which is covered by a transverse ligament [retinaculum mm. fibularium superius] (the ligament is S in the 2nd table of muscles; the muscles are x [m. fibularis longus] and y [m. fibularis brevis]) and brings down the tendons of the sixth and seventh of the muscles that move the foot, containing them lest they move out of place. The inner side of the same malleolus shows on its lowest surface towards the posterior a deep, rough depression [fossa malleoli lateralis] (r in figs. 2, 6, 11) from which it puts forth a cartilaginous ligament 41 (g in the figure for ch. 1, Bk. 2) that quite firmly connects the fibula here to the talus.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula