Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula

Articulation of the fibula with the talus

The outer side of the lower epiphysis of the tibia puts forth no process corresponding to the inner malleolus. But the epiphysis (E in fig. 1, n in figs. 2, 5, 6, 9) of the fibula that is attached to the outside of the tibia thickens considerably here and is carried farther downward than the interior malleolus. This is the reason why the talus is dislocated less often to the outside of the foot than to the inside. The fibula here descends as much lower than the tibia as the tibia extends above the fibula on top toward the femur; in this way the fibula is not in the least exceeded in length by the tibia. This lower epiphysis of the fibula makes up the outer side [facies articularis malleoli] (h in figs. 9, 11) of the hollow that receives the talus. But the epiphysis is coated with cartilage and so protrudes on its inner [medialis] side that one could justly say it is more truly received by the talus [talus, facies malleolaris lateralis] (H in fig. 6, ch. 33) than it receives it, even though it closely covers the outer side of the talus and in this manner encloses the talus together with the inner malleolus, so that in undamaged persons the talus can never be touched.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula