Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula

The depressions and eminences of the tibia, by which it is articulated to the talus

The lower epiphyses of the tibia and fibula together form the socket (d, e, f, g, h in fig. 9) and the area [trochlea tali, facies superior] [facies malleolaris medialis et lateralis] to which the talus (all of figs. 3-6, ch. 33) is articulated as if by mutual entry. If you pay careful attention to the depressions and eminences of the tibia and fibula, you will rightly assign the connection of the talus with the tibia to the type of ginglymus. 29 We shall provide an account of the talus in its own place; now we must consider the depression [facies articularis inferior, facies articularis malleoli] on the surface of the tibia’s lower epiphysis, which is rather wide and more or less a double depression (e, f in figs. 9, 10) because in the middle it is divided by a wide but rather prominent eminence (d in figs. 9, 10) and is distinctly hollowed more deeply at the sides of the eminence. At the inner [medialis] side of this depression the lower epiphysis of the tibia is brought down in a large, strong process [malleolus medialis] (F in fig. 1, i in figs. 2, 3, 9, 10) which is hollow [facies articularis malleoli] on its outer [lateralis] side (g in fig. 9) where it faces the cavity [articulatio talocruralis] and like the cavity is smooth and coated with cartilage [c. articularis]. On its inner side facing the other leg, it is convex; and since it is unfleshed (k in the 2nd table of muscles) and covered with no muscle parts, it is readily perceived in us by touch: it is the inner malleolus [tibia, malleolus medialis].



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula