Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula

Where the fibula separates from the tibia

Through the remaining length of the lower leg, the fibula separates considerably from the tibia (Y between V and X in fig. 2) — not, in fact, because it is curved like the radius (from k to k in fig. 1, ch. 24) or is as it were slanted outward from the tibia, but because the tibia is so thick above and below and slender in the rest of its length, that the fibula being attached to those areas of the tibia where it is thick easily separates a good deal from the whole slenderer part of the tibia. But it parts less from the tibia to the same degree that the fibula is not straight, being slightly curved inward toward the tibia a little below the middle of the tibia’s length (Z in figs. 1, 2), becoming flat or concave on its outer side. I shall more opportunely describe the course of the tibia and the fibula and the projecting lines and indentations along their length when I discuss these bones’ upper and lower parts, by which they are attached to others. The upper epiphysis of the tibia is attached to the femur and the fibula in the way I have stated. The anterior 25 surface (A, B in fig. 1, a, b in figs. 1, 3, 7) of the same epiphysis is quite depressed and rough, 26 as is the anterior surface of the tibia closest to the epiphysis, called by many of the Greeks a)ntiknh/mion, 27 which is rough in order to receive the extremely strong tendons of the muscles (5, 6 in the 5th table of muscles, W, g, h, i, etc. in the 8th) 28 that move the tibia; for the sake of these tendons, the upper epiphysis of the fibula protrudes significantly on its outer side and upper portion [apex capitis fibulae] (c in figs. 5, 6) to receive the very robust tendon (Y in the 10th table of muscles, a in the 2nd) of the fourth muscle [m. biceps femoris] that moves the tibia. This part of the fibula puts forth the head of the seventh (x in the 2nd table of muscles, F in the 6th) of the muscles [m. fibularis brevis] that move the foot.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula