Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula

The connection of the fibula to the tibia

That is how the tibia is articulated to the femur. The fibula, however, does not ascend so high that it touches the femur; but its upper epiphysis has a depression [facies articularis capitis fibulae] (Q in fig. 5) on its inner side that is quite lightly incised and wide, to which the slightly projecting eminence [facies articularis fibularis] (R in fig. 4) of the epiphysis of the tibia is articulated [articulatio tibiofibularis]. This eminence, situated on the outside [lateralis] of the tibia towards the rear, is like the depression of the fibula coated with cartilage [cart. articularis]. At its lower end (X in fig. 2), the fibula is attached to the tibia by a different method of articulation [syndesmosis tibiofibularis] than above (V in fig. 2). The outer side of the tibia forms a long depression [incisura fibularis] (S in figs. 4, 10) in which the protruding inner side (T in figs. 5, 6, 11) of the fibula is inserted; the latter is somewhat rough as is the depression of the tibia, and not at all coated with cartilage. The depression does not 24 receive the fibula with a smooth contact; but where these bones are joined a powerful ligament intercedes, binding them not just on their circumference [lig. tibiofibulare anterius, lig. tibiofibulare posterius] but also where they contact each other [lig. tibiofibulare interosseus].



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 31 On the Tibia and Fibula