Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

Epiphysis of the hipbone

The epiphysis of the hipbone (l marks the posterior area in fig. 2, q the anterior) [tuber ischiadicum] will not be hastily investigated on its entire lower surface, attached to the point on which we rest when we sit. This epiphysis, to which the bone fuses, preserves its breadth. Both for the sake of strength and for the origin of muscles it is seen to be remarkably thick and quite wide. From this epiphysis, at a minimum, four large muscles originate, each of whose heads claims a depression and place of its own (in fig. 2, the first is m, the second o, the third n, the fourth from p to q) on the epiphysis, easily visible in a cleaned bone. 55 The first (F in the 10th table of muscles) [m. semitendinosus] will be the third of the muscles that move the tibia, taking its origin from the higher 56 part of this epiphysis. The second (Y in the same table, and m and later ϖ in the 11th table) [m. biceps femoris, caput longum] will be held to be the fourth of the muscles that move the tibia; the beginning of this muscle is less wide than that of the first, and it begins more towards the anterior, next to the outermost side of the first muscle. The third muscle (Y in the 11th table of muscles) [m. semimembranosus] I shall consider the fifth of those that move the tibia. The fourth (W in the 11th table, C in the 12th) [m. adductor magnus] is the largest part of the muscle that Galen counts as the fifth of the muscles that move the tibia, 57 but which I shall say constitutes the fifth of those that move the femur. This occupies the largest area of the epiphysis with its origin, and is easily the largest of all the muscles in the body. This is how the middle part 58 of the bone we are describing, which we call the hipbone, is arranged.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum