Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

The acetabulum provided to articulate the femur

Into this area of the hipbone 45 (e, f, g in figs. 1 and 2) is incised the deepest of all depressions of the body into which a bone is articulated, not everywhere smooth and coated with slippery cartilage [cartilago hyalina]. For in its anterior area, a considerable portion (g in figs. 1 and 2) [fossa acetabuli] is cut more deeply than its remaining circumference [fossa lunata]; it is rough and filled with certain small, blind foramina whose purpose is to put forth a ligament (P in fig. 2, ch. 49, Bk. 2) [lig. capitis femoris] which is smoothly rounded and inserted into the middle or vertex [fovea capitis femoris] of the femoral head. The brows 46 (i, i, in figs. 1, 2) [limbus acetabuli] of the acetabulum protrude less in the anterior than in the posterior because


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it was necessary when people are sitting for the femur to be flexed at a greater angle than to be extended or moved posteriorly when they are standing or doing anything else. It should further be noted in the lower area of the brows of the hipbone or acetabular depression that the brows 47 are not carried in a continuous circular course but are cut off and interrupted as if to provide a course for the small vein (ei in the figure preceding ch. 6, Bk. 3) [v. obturatoria] that runs this way into the rough area of the acetabulum that is not covered with cartilage; it supplies nourishment to the joint from which a viscid humor 48 (of which a good deal needs to be accumulated in this joint) is produced by whose aid the joint is readily made movable. Lest the joint be made prone to dislocation because of this gap cut in the brow, Nature attached a strong cartilaginous ligament [labrum acetabulare] around the brows which is seen nowhere to be interrupted and augments the socket even more than the brows, and provides a path for the small vein 49 that runs between the bone and the posterior surface of the ligament, 50 so that at the same time the vein might be borne along safely and the socket would not increase its chance of dislocation — even though we see the femur dislocated more often here. 51 But we shall deal with the ligaments and veins at the appropriate points. Now, however, the small blind foramina should be noted everywhere on the outer surface of the brows of the acetabulum in the hipbone, provided to put forth as strong as possible a ligament (P, P in the fig. in ch. 1, Bk. 2) [capsula articularis: lig. iliofemorale, ischiofemorale, et pubofemorale] surrounding and binding the femur to the hipbone.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum