Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

Muscles occupying the inner space of the ilium

From the inner surface of the wide part of the ilium originates first the muscle (C in the 8th table of muscles) [m. quadratus lumborum] that will be the ninth of the movers of the back, which takes a portion of its origin from the smooth but quite broad hollow (next to the left [right] side of K, K in fig. 3) of the ilium, visible near the region of the transverse processes of the fifth lumbar vertebra. But besides this compression of the ilium there is another great hollow [fossa iliaca] in it (within P, L, K, K, M, N, S in fig. 3), not at all rough, occupied by the seventh [m. iliacus] of the muscles that move the femur (L in the 8th table of muscles); we shall explain that this muscle originates from a wide, fleshy, semicircular beginning in this inner breadth of the ilium and then gradually narrows and together with the tendon of the sixth (Q in the same table) [m. psoas major] of the muscles that move the femur and the first nerve (57 in fig. 2, ch. 10, Bk. 4 and z in the 10th table of muscles) [n. femoralis] 37 to the leg is taken through the depression (T in figs. 1, 2, 3) [sulcus supra-acetabularis] carved especially for it in the hipbone. 38



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum