Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

Muscles occupying the epiphysis

The bone [ilium] is indented on its inner surface so that this spine will be widened here and better put forth the fleshy part of the transverse abdominal muscle (D in the 6th table of muscles). On its outer side the epiphysis is compressed and widened so that the fleshy part of the obliquely ascending abdominal muscle (P in the 4th table of muscles) [m. obliquus internus abdominis] may best originate from here and the obliquely descending abdominal muscle (Q in the 3rd table of muscles) [m. obliquus externus abdominis] may be inserted here. The entire upper surface of the epiphysis is occupied by these three muscles. As these are wider and more fleshy on the sides of the ilium than next to the backbone or on the anterior surface of the abdomen, so too the part of the epiphysis (from R, through R, to P in fig. 2) which faces the sides of the abdomen and is anterior, together with the surface of the ilium to which the epiphysis is attached, is heavier than the part (from R through H to Q in fig. 2) next to the vertebrae and the backbone. The anterior extremity of the epiphysis (P in figs. 1, 2, 3), or the anterior part of the spine of the ilium [spina iliaca anterior superior], is very thick 35 because in addition to the abdominal muscles attached to it, it provides an origin to two muscles, one of them to be numbered the first of the movers [m. sartorius] of the tibia (S and later s in the 3rd table of muscles), the other the sixth (F, then x in the same table) [m. tensor fasciae latae]. 36



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum