Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

The epiphysis of the ilium: spine, back

The remaining breadth of the ilium, not unlike a flat semicircle, has an epiphysis (L, R, R in fig. 1, H, R, R, P in fig. 2, P, L, H, Q in fig. 3) [crista iliaca] on its upper surface along the entire circumference of the semicircle which the ancients called the spine of the ilium. They named the outermost [lateral] portion of its breadth [ala ossis ilii] the back of the ilium [facies glutealis] because it is wide and more or less convex if compared to the inner [medial] surface [fossa iliaca]. The [anterior] surface of the epiphysis projects outward, and is rightly considered as it were the spine [spina iliaca anterior superior] of that back [ala ossis ilii]. But although the ancients rightly established these names, and Galen noticed that there is also a distinction between them as between the parts of a bone, 33 nevertheless in his description of muscles that move the tibia and the femur he frequently confused the dorsum [ala ossis ilii, facies glutealis]


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with the spine. We shall avoid this wherever possible by calling the outer [lateral] region of the broad part of the ilium [ala ossis ilii] the back; its semicircular epiphysis, which is rough and uneven, and compressed 34 on both its inner (L in figs. 1 and 3) [labium internum] and outer (R, R in figs. 1 and 2) [labium externum] sides, we shall call the spine [crista iliaca].



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum