Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

The use of the bones attached to the sides of the sacrum

There is a very great affinity with the scapulae in the use of these bones. For as the scapulae are formed particularly to articulate the humerus, these are especially accommodated to articulate the femur (L into Q in the skeletons), so that man may stand erect and sit with their aid. As the scapula is wide and equipped with various processes (to make it fitter for admitting and putting 23 several muscles), so these bones show nearly every type of construction designed so that almost all the muscles moving the femur can originate from them — in addition to others which originate from these bones and provide movements to the tibia, thorax, and back. 24 What muscles 25 originate from these bones and which ones are implanted in them, the order of narrative describing the parts of the bones will explain. But now, a use of these bones that is by no means the smallest no smallest must not be omitted, how in the common way of bones they are placed beneath the other parts of the body like fulcrums, and hold them in or surround them. These two bones (Q [os ilii] with M [vertebra lumbaris V] in skeletons 1 and 3) together with the sacrum form a kind of basin 26 which neatly supports the intestines and the bladder [vesica urinaria] (these are found in the figures of Book V, especially 22, 24, and 25), and in women it most elegantly contains the uterus and keeps safe the parts that it encloses.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum