Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum

Ilium; Pubis; Hipbone

Its broad part, both superior and posterior, the part [facies sacropelvica, f. auricularis] attached to the sacrum, is called the ilium, while the anterior part of the same bone, by which it is joined (j in the skeletal figures) [symphysis pubica, discus interpubicus] with the bone of the other side in the region of the pubis and has a wide foramen, is called the pubic bone. The area between, positioned at the entrance of the femur, is called the hipbone [os ischii]. In this way the bone of one side [os coxae] is named no differently than if it were constructed of three bones ending at their own border, posterior, anterior, and middle, or ilium, pubis, and hipbone. The entire bone is called the coxa by Celsus, and the i)sxi/on (which is the hipbone) by the author of Introductio seu medicus and often by Hippocrates, 21 though both also call the wider, posterior part of this bone the ilium and the anterior the pubis,


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as do other professors of dissection. I believe it is possible to say ilium os (with the indulgence of those who study nothing but names) also when I have occasion to mention just the wide part of either bone, since ilis or ile is less frequently used. 22



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 29 On the Bones Which Are Attached to the Sides of the Sacrum