Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 25 On the Carpus

The carpus is constructed of eight bones differing from each other in shape 14

The Greeks call the part of the hand (V to Z in the skeletal figures, nos. 1-8 in all the figures of this chapter) that is articulated to the forearm karpo/j; we call it brachiale in imitation of Celsus. 15 It is constructed of eight bones separated in a double row. In people of mature years, these bones are hard and small, not porous inside, and filled with a slight amount of marrow like the epiphyses, not altogether lacking in marrow. 16 This is particularly so in the larger of these bones, as they are all of different size, shape, and location, nor is there one in the lot which at all resembles another: each one has some feature by which it can readily be distinguished from the others. But varied though they be, they are so harmoniously fitted to each other and attain such a unity of composition, that their number is not very easy to discover. For unless you cut away the very strong cartilaginous ligaments [articulationes carpi] (D in the 8th table of muscles, l in the 12th) with which they are covered, as well as the membranes, and carefully scrape them off, they will all appear to be a single one, 17 or like Celsus you will believe they consist of an uncertain number. 18



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 25 On the Carpus