Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 22 On the Clavicles

The marvellous curvature of the clavicle

From this joint [articulatio sternoclavicularis] with the pectoral bone, the clavicle extends by no straight course to its other joint [art. acromioclavicularis] (at Q in figs. 1, 2, 3) by which it is connected to the upper process of the scapula. As it proceeds from the pectoral bone (from A to H in figs. 1 and 2) it curves gradually outward, becoming convex in its anterior part and concave in its posterior. But there (from H to Q in figs. 1 and 2), after the midpoint of its length, it proceeds in an opposite course, curving and becoming convex on the inside, but concave on its anterior surface. It bulges prominently forward where it is closest to the superior process of the scapula, thus becoming twice convex and twice concave. The part ending at the pectoral bone, also called parasfagi/j, 13 extends more to the back, or to the inside of the thorax; the part articulated to the upper process of the scapula, also called the e)pwmi/j, 14 moves forward and outward from the inner part of the thorax as the clavicle changes course midway. Thus it is convex in its anterior part, in the anterior part of the chest not far from its joint with the pectoral bone, and concave in its internal part. Not far from the acromion, its anterior part is concave with a very short curve, but in its posterior region bulging and convex. To express briefly a subject that must be considered carefully because of frequent dislocations and fractures of the clavicles, the course of the clavicle resembles our letter ∫ , especially if we imagine it curved a little more in mid-course like a capital S, thus: {Sclav.gif}.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 22 On the Clavicles