Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 21 On the Scapuli

The use of the acromion

We shall explain better for what use the acromion is given to humans and other animals possessing clavicles when we have begun our account of the clavicles. For besides the fact that this process prevents an upward dislocation of the shoulder, it is an extremely safe bulwark for the shoulder joint, and serves perfectly for the origin and insertion of muscles [mm. deltoideus et trapezius]; it is most of all helpful, when the clavicle is attached, in holding the shoulder joint as far as possible from the sides and ribs of the thorax, and keeping it in a place which it most requires for those quite various and different motions that it performs. 85 These matters will be resumed at greater length in the descriptions of the clavicles, for it will soon be time to put a limit on our discussion of the scapulae, especially as nothing else remains to be explained except perhaps something quite small. Such a thing could be that the base of the scapula, where it is equipped with epiphyses, is quite spongy and porous. Several foramina [canalis nutriens] extend into the spine of the scapula, carrying veins to it (since it is thick) to supply it with nutriment. One (c in fig. 3) is often seen in the broad part [fossa supraspinata] that is formed by the upper side of the scapula and its spine, and another on the inner surface of the scapula where it is more deeply hollowed.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 21 On the Scapuli