Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 21 On the Scapuli

Position and attachments of the scapula

The scapulae, one on each side (R in the three skeletal figs.), rest upon the posterior region of the thorax near the top; they are attached to the occipital bone, the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, the ribs, and the hyoid bone by muscles alone. The scapula is attached to the occipital bone with the help of the second of the muscles that move the scapula (G, D in the 9th table of muscles), 17 which also joins it to the spines of several vertebrae, 18 as does the third agent of scapular motions [m. levator scapulae] (G in the 12th table of muscles), which binds it to the neck vertebrae 19 [vertebrae cervicales]. The fourth of the muscles that move the scapula [m. rhomboideus major] (G in the 10th table) braces it on several spines of the thoracic and cervical vertebrae. The first of the muscles that move the scapula [m. pectoralis minor] (G in the 5th table) and the second of the muscles that move the thorax [m. serratus anterior] (L in the 7th table) join the scapula to the ribs. The scapula is linked to the hyoid bone by the seventh [m. omohyoideus] of that bone’s particular muscles. In humans, monkeys, squirrels, and whatever other animals have clavicles, the scapula is articulated with the clavicles (Q to l in the complete skeletons) by a mass of ligaments [l. acromioclaviculare, l. coracoclaviculare] and is conterminous with the clavicle.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 21 On the Scapuli