Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 20 On the Cartilaginous Substance Which Is Ascribed to the Base of the Heart, Or the Bone of the Heart

[Introduction]


This figure illustrates the roots of the great artery [aorta] and the arterial vein [truncus pulmonalis] in a perfunctory way, separated from all connected bodies and parts and closely resembling two circles. 1 The letter A marks the root of the great artery, B the root of the arterial vein. C [tunica externa] identifies the connection by which the vessels are attached to each other at their very beginning. 2 This connection, which is essentially cartilaginous, should not be looked for in this rough figure, but in other figures of the sixth book, most of all the eighth and tenth, which should be looked over in passing, together with the indices to the characters. But it would be cumbersome for me to print the same plates numerous times in several places.


Lest perhaps we seem to have omitted any bone in the present book, we thought we should at this point make mention of the bony substance of the heart.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 20 On the Cartilaginous Substance Which Is Ascribed to the Base of the Heart, Or the Bone of the Heart