Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 17 On the Lumbar Vertebrae

The spine

Their spine (C, D, E, F, G in fig. 2) is strong and thick, and proportionally to the mass of these vertebrae not very tall or long. If you look at the left and right it is thin, but if you consider its top and bottom (figure 2, from C to D) it is very wide. It is sharp above (C in figs. 1, 2, 3), ending in a rough line, but thicker below and having two depressions, as it were (D is the line in fig. 2; E marks one of the depressions), in the middle of which a line or long tubercle 6 is produced from which a ligament runs to the upper line on the spine of the vertebra beneath. This ligament [ll. interspinalia] fills the interval between the spines and separates the right muscles from the left 7 in the same way as the ligament (V in the 7th table of muscles) [membrana interossea] between the ulna and the radius more or less divides the inner muscles of the forearm from the outer. There is a point 8 (F, G in figs. 2 and 3) on the epiphysis of the spine as there is on the spines of the thoracic vertebrae; it is quite blunt, and looks somewhat triangular if you place one leg of the triangle at either side and the third (which is shorter 9 than the others) at the base of the spine’s epiphysis.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 17 On the Lumbar Vertebrae