Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 17 On the Lumbar Vertebrae

Key to the Three Figures of the Seventeenth Chapter and Their Characters

Since all the lumbar vertebrae take the same form, we have illustrated here only one of them, in three aspects. In the first figure we present the vertebra's anterior aspect, in the second the side, in the third the posterior aspect.

A 1 , 2 , 3 Superior epiphysis of the vertebral body.
B 1 , 2 Inferior epiphysis of the vertebral body. 1
C, D, E, F, G These letters, not all visible in same figure, mark the spine [processus spinosus]; each shows a separate feature in the spine as follows:
C 1 , 2 , 3 Superior portion of the spine of the lumbar vertebra, or its wide, rough line.
D 2 Hidden in the shading below the spine in the second figure, D marks the inferior line of the spine.
E 2 Not far from D, E marks the depression of one side, lying to the side of the line marked D.
F and G 2 , 3 Epiphysis of the spine, resembling a triangle whose base is labeled G and acute angle F. 2
H 1 , 2 , 3 Transverse process [processus transversus] of one side.
I 1 , 2 , 3 Ascending process [processus articularis superior] of one side.
K, L, M 2 , 3 Ascending process of the other side, labeled more expressly: K marks the depression [facies articularis], L the anterior lip or brow of this depression, M the posterior brow [processus mammillaris].
O 2 , 3 Descending process [processus articularis inferior] of one side. In the third figure, it marks the tubercle or head of the process. 3


So that you may follow more easily the location and form of the processes to be described separately in this chapter, we have shown in this figure the lumbar vertebra of a caudate monkey from its right side, where A and A mark the vertebral body. B is the transverse process, here clearly facing upward. C marks the spine, which also


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slants upward. D and E show the two ascending processes, F and G the two descending processes. Finally, H marks the process [p. accessorius] which (as you will soon hear) human lumbar vertebrae lack. 4

We have already gone over nearly everything having to do with the lumbar vertebrae; rather than linger too long in their description, we shall summarize the facts previously mentioned and add whatever special information this chapter calls for.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 17 On the Lumbar Vertebrae