Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 15 On the Vertebrae of the Neck or Cervix

(C) In the thoracic vertebrae.

The vertebrae of the thorax fall into a middle category: those nearer the neck resemble the neck vertebrae in this foramen of the nerves; those next to the lumbar vertebrae look like the lumbar vertebrae in the shape of the foramen. Why indeed Nature carved foramina [f. intervertebrale] for the nerves between the occipital bone and the first vertebra (H in fig. 2 and F in fig. 3 of ch. 11, Bk. 4) and again between this vertebra and the second (N in fig. 2 and I in fig. 3 of ch. 11, Bk. 4) in a different location than in the remaining vertebrae, is I believe obvious to anyone who understands from the preceding the structure of the joints between the first vertebra and the head [os occipitale], and between that vertebra and the second, and their locations. For they clearly demonstrate that those vertebrae could in no way be carved out on sides occupied by a joint unless Nature had made an altogether weak and feeble joint at this point, or wished the nerves to be broken or damaged by the rubbing of bones in constant motion. With what foresight she hollowed these foramina in the sacrum [ff. sacralia pelvica et posteriora] (nos. 25-30 in fig. 2 and E to 56 in fig. 3, ch. 11, Bk. 4) I shall explain in my account of that bone. As for what still pertains to the present chapter, the neck vertebrae have no other feature peculiar to themselves.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 15 On the Vertebrae of the Neck or Cervix