Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 15 On the Vertebrae of the Neck or Cervix

The nature of foramina that transmit nerves laterally: (A) In the vertebrae of the neck.

The foramina made in the sides of the vertebrae (Q, Q in the fig. for chapter 14) [foramen intervertebrale] for transmitting nerves from the dorsal medulla and admitting veins and arteries to it, are established in a uniform set beneath the second neck vertebra all the way to the sacral bone. Between the side of the posterior portion of the vertebral body and the ascending and descending processes, a depression is carved above [incisura vertebralis superior] (j in figs. 8 and 9) and below [incisura vertebralis inferior] (t in fig. 7) on both sides, which, with the depression of the adjacent vertebra, makes a common foramen [f. intervertebrale] by which a nerve exits. These depressions vary in all the vertebrae: in the neck vertebrae, a semicircle is carved in the upper vertebra and a semicircle in the lower, with each vertebra making an equal effort toward the establishment of the foramen. But if someone scrutinized each one closely, a lower vertebra in the neck would make up a slightly larger portion of the foramen than an upper. For the depression (j in figs. 8 and 9) [pediculus arcus vertebrae] carved in the upper part of the vertebra between the ascending process [p. articularis superior] and the process which the upper part [uncus corporis] of the vertebral body puts forth (between d and q in fig. 9) is deeper than the depression (t in fig. 7) that is hollowed between the descending process [p. articularis inferior] and the vertebral body (between b and e in fig. 7).



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 15 On the Vertebrae of the Neck or Cervix