Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon

How the hyoid bone is secured; its use

Inasmuch as the hyoid bone does not rest on as firm a base as the other bones, we shall explain in Book Two that it is drawn into every kind of position by its own muscles, in such a way that it cannot be dislocated from its place either to the sides, up and down, or forward and backward. And though in humans it happens to be extremely small, it performs the greatest and most numerous functions; these will be explained when we show that several muscles of the tongue (D, D, E in figs. 1, 2, ch. 19 Bk. 2) [Mm. hyoglossi] originate from it, that it is placed beneath the tongue like a foundation and very steady base, and that the beginnings of certain muscles of the larynx (F in figs. 1, 2, ch. 21, Bk. 2 and K in figs. 2, 3) [mm. thyrohyoidei] extend from it.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon