Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon

Superior sides and attached ossicles

To the upper ossicle or side [cornu minor], which appears more rounded, are joined in turn other long, rounded ossicles (L, M, and N in figure 1) in a continuous series, until their ends are inserted in the temporal bone near the base its process, which we have often mentioned looks like a writer’s stylus [processus styloideus]; this can be seen most clearly in quadrupeds. 11 These ossicles, attached to the superior sides of the hyoid bone, are not always observed in an equal number, but usually three or four are seen on each side. From time to time, however, especially in women, we have seen these ossicles and the upper sides missing altogether, and in their place a certain rounded, strong, elongated ligament [l. stylohyoideum] attached to the hyoid bone and the styloid process. This has been called to my attention more than once by my good friend Renaldo Colombo 12 , now a professor of sophistic at Padua, a most diligent student of anatomy. The hyoid bone is therefore neither free-floating nor contiguous to any bone, as the connection of the superior sides to the temporal bones shows. The lower sides also, attached by a ligament [membranea thyrohyoidea] to the processes of the shield-like cartilage, attest to the same fact. For the cartilages of the larynx, like the cartilages of the ribs, perform the function of bones, and so far as their contiguity is concerned, are counted in the same class as bones.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon