Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon

Middle ossicle of the hyoid bone

The human has this bone quite differently constructed than the quadruped, which until now we have dealt with, and it is the broadest ossicle of the hyoid bone (A, B, *, C in fig. 1, D in fig. 2), convex on the outside and jutting forward with its own protuberance; but inside, or in the posterior surface, it is concave. On the anterior, it is indented on top as in an elongated depression, because the shape is suitable to it, and because of the muscles and ligaments attached to it. For into the upper depression are implanted the third and fourth muscles (R in the 4th table of muscles) [musculi mylohyoidei] peculiar to this bone;


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on the protuberance visible in this location, at the sides which are somewhat impressed in the area where it swells, the first two muscles [musculi sternohyoidei] peculiar to this bone make their insertion (S and T in the 4th table of muscles; the other muscles of this bone are Q [m. stylohyoideus] and V [m. omohyoideus]). From the hollow of the posterior side the first two muscles [radix linguae] that move the tongue have their principal origin (see D, D in figs. 1 and 2, Bk. II, Ch. 19). Moreover, because the hyoid is convex on the outside but hollow inside, the muscles are also conveniently placed farther from the path of injuries coming from the outside. This larger ossicle [corpus ossis hyoidei], positioned slightly above the larynx, may be found by touch, but its sides [cornua] are a little more deeply hidden. To this wider ossicle two others [cornua minora et majora] are united on each side. 10 One of these is lower, the other higher.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 13 On the Bone Resembling the Greek Upsilon