Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 11 On The Teeth, Which are also counted as bones

Roots of the teeth

The teeth are not fitted to their sockets with the same number of roots: small teeth have a single root [radix dentis], while larger teeth have two and the largest three or four (at the beginning of the chapter we have pictured a typical series of roots). Incisors are attached by single roots. Canines also put forth single roots, which are inserted much more deeply than the incisors’ roots and are larger in proportion to the greater strength of the canines. Among the incisors, the two in the middle are attached by more prominent roots than the two lateral incisors next to the canines, no doubt because the middle pair are wider and larger. Molars vary in respect to their roots: those that are affixed to the lower jaw generally have two roots; those in the upper jaw regularly have three. Yet even these sometimes differ, upper molars having four roots apiece; those below are sometimes discovered to be embedded by three roots, especially the two next to the innermost tooth. Quite often you will see the two upper molars [dentes premolares] next to the canine tooth inserted with only two roots and the three remaining [dentes molares] with three each; similarly, the two lower molars [dentes premolares] next the canine have a single root, and the other three [dentes molares] two roots. You will also observe that the innermost [molaris tertius] are attached by smaller roots than those next to them.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 11 On The Teeth, Which are also counted as bones