Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 10 On The Lower Maxilla

Breadth, thinness, depressions, and rough spots in the posterior area of the jaw

Where no teeth are fixed in the jaw, and in that place where it puts out the processes just mentioned, the maxilla looks very wide, and, if you examine the sides, quite thin, carved inside (D in figure 2) and outside (E in figures 1 and 2) [angulus mandibulae] with a kind of wide depression, indented on the surface only, so that the muscles other than the temporal muscle that elevate the jaw 18 might better fit in their insertion [tuberositas masseterica, tuberositas pterygoidea], and so that the muscle that is hidden in the mouth (D in the 6th table of muscles) [musculus pterygoideus medialis] might crowd the narrow part of the pharynx [pars nasalis pharyngis] less with its thickness and mass. Accordingly, the jawbone is rightly hollowed on the inside more than on the outside. Indeed, it is characteristic of this wider surface of the maxilla that it is rough and uneven especially near the inferior and posterior region of this part (E in figs. 1 and 2). The Maker of things contrives this for the insertion of muscles, not unaware that something adheres and attaches more readily to rough and uneven places than to level and smooth ones. It is also for this reason that the inside of the maxilla near the chin swells with a number of tubercles or rough places (H in fig. 2) [spina mentalis superior et inferior] so that the muscles by which it is drawn downward (H and I in the 5th table of muscles) 19 might achieve a stronger insertion, and finally so that several peculiar muscles of the tongue (H in figs. 1 and 2, ch. 19, Bk. 2) [musculi genioglossi] might better fit their origin here. Something of this sort also happens on the outer surface of the lower maxilla around the tip of the chin so that the muscles of the lower lip 20 (N in the 4th table of muscles) may more easily originate from there.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 10 On The Lower Maxilla