Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 9 On the Twelve Bones of the Upper Maxilla, Including the Bones of the Nose

Appendix B: How to distinguish the maxillary bones

. . . These bones are attached to each other and to adjacent bones of the head by sutures and harmoniae [suturae planae]. Now since such harmoniae, if they are ever broken apart, greatly resemble on their inside an attachment to each other which is more or less comparable to a suture, anatomists identify them as sutures in their accounts of the upper maxilla. But in order conveniently to study all such joints with the bones surrounded by them, and to observe how the otherwise obscure and inconsistent descriptions of Galen conform here better to dogs and apes than to humans, cover up all the sutures of the human skull that you can find, however hard to see, and even those that look like harmoniae: cover them on one side with blacking just as I am accustomed to do in the schools — for in this way they will be easier to see as if made heavier and dyed — and you will more readily understand the entire outline of the bones according to the account which I shall now set forth, and consider thereafter the structure of the dog and the ape.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 9 On the Twelve Bones of the Upper Maxilla, Including the Bones of the Nose