Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 8 On the Ossicles That Enter Upon the Construction of the Organ of Hearing

Comparison of the second ossicle to the femoral bone

This process might be compared to the part of the femur (figs. in ch. 30) that extends from the processes we call rotators 9 to the lower heads [condylus medialis, condylus lateralis] of the femur; indeed, if you imagine these lower heads cut away from the rest of the femur, the whole ossicle would look just like it. For as the femur has two processes [trochanter major, trochanter minor] near its neck, this ossicle has some small processes [p. anterior, p. lateralis] in the same place by which it is more firmly attached to its membrane [membrana tympanica]. Then, as the neck of the femoral bone slopes obliquely toward the inside of the body near the socket [acetabulum] of the hip bone and comes to an end at a perfectly round head [caput femoris], so this ossicle turns inward away from the membrane and ends in a round head [caput mallei] which is smooth and not at all rough, and is joined (P, Q) [articulatio mallearis] by very thin membranes [capsula articularis] to the upper part [corpus incudis] of the other ossicle [incus] that we compared to an anvil or molar, like a hammer loosely attached to an anvil: no differently than if one ossicle just mentioned were working as a little hammer and the other an anvil, but much too small in proportion to the size of the malleus.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 8 On the Ossicles That Enter Upon the Construction of the Organ of Hearing