Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

A bone inside the canine skull 119

This is how the bones of the head are arranged, forming a place where the brain is contained. Someone might think from Galen’s book De ossibus that another bone should be added to them which will be judged to be located in the brain; for at the end of his book, among the bones not described to medical students, Galen seems to have counted another in the brain. 120 It is perhaps a process 121 of the occipital bone that is quite evident in dogs, but it is never less apparent than in humans. In dogs, a broad, thin bone 122 comes between the cerebellum and the cerebrum where in humans we observe only the hard membrane of the brain (O, O in figure 7, Book 7). Since there is no other mention of this bone in Galen, it must be asked whether that canine process is what he had in mind, or whether someone prior to him mentioned it (as I believe Marinus had done) 123 and Galen never afterwards saw it in his cattle, whose brains he most often dissected, and was willing consequently to mention this bone only in a perfunctory way lest in his tractate on anatomy he seem to have omitted anything that other experts in dissection had mentioned in any way. As will be clearly shown in what follows, this was the case with the acromion or upper process of the scapula, when because of a few words of Hippocrates he reported that a certain third bone 124 is observed in addition to the clavicle and the acromion at the joint of those bones (Q to l in the skeletons).



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them