Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

The borders of the occipital bone

The occipital bone (M, M in figures 3, 4, 5. It is circumscribed in figure 3 by C, D, then in figure 5 by m, m, m, m, and n, n) ends at the lambdoid suture, its extensions, and the line joining them. It therefore consists more or less of five sides: the two made by the legs of the lambdoid suture, two others [suturae occipitomastoideae] which are defined by the extensions of that suture, and finally a fifth marked by the line 100 that is considered common to the occipital and cuneiform bones. This bone is quite uneven in thickness, nor is it everywhere consistent with itself. Whatever is unfleshed in the occiput and free of the origins and insertions of muscles, is quite thick, 101 as much thicker than the frontal bone as that bone is thicker than the bones of the vertex.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them