Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

On a passage in Galen’s De ossibus; the suture between the frontal bone, the bones of the maxilla, and others.

Further, this portion of suture which I said lies between the frontal bone and the cuneiform bone is a large part of one of two sutures which Galen says are common to the head [calvaria] and other bones. He counts as one of them the suture that surrounds the cuneiform bone where we said it borders on the occiput, the temporal bones, and the vertex. 87 After describing the suture surrounding the cuneiform bone, 88 he says that the other of the two (from b to g [sutura sphenofrontalis], g in figures 3 and 4 [sutura frontozygomatica, sutura sphenozygomatica]; 89 then see R [sutura frontozygomatica], S, T, V, X, Z and the interval of this suture in figure 1, chapter 9) extends from the hollows of the temples through the middle of the eye sockets to the top of the nose or halfway between the brows. 90 It does in fact so extend, beginning where the suture surrounding the cuneiform bone descends through the hollow of the temples towards the innermost tooth [dens molaris]. In its first segment this suture separates the frontal bone from the bone of the upper maxilla [os zygomaticum] that makes up the outer angle of the eye socket; then, for some distance, it separates the cuneiform [alae major et minor ossis sphenoidalis] from the frontal bone along the entire course where these adjoin in the eye sockets and the inner surface of the skull. That is why this portion is considered to be part of the suture around the cuneiform bone, not part of the separation of the frontal bone from the other bones of the maxilla. So it is that the next part of the suture leading transversely through the eye sockets separates the frontal bone from the second, third, fourth, and fifth bones of the upper maxilla 91 on one side and is common to the frontal bone and these bones of the maxilla along the entire surface where this suture occupies the inner angle of the eye socket and the top of the nose [nasion] 92 or midway between the brows [glabella]. We shall talk about the bones and sutures of the upper maxilla in the ninth Chapter, where we shall need to resume discussion of this suture. Now we must separately enumerate the eight bones of the head which are surrounded by the sutures so far counted, 93 together forming the space [basis cranii interna] of the head wherein the brain is contained. There are two bones of the vertex [ossa parietalia], one on each side; two below, one near each ear, which I have been calling the temporal bones;


page 30

the fifth is the frontal bone, usually a single one; sixth is the occiput , likewise single; seventh is the cuneiform, also single; the eighth shall be considered that bone [os ethmoidale] constituting the place wherein lie the two processes of the brain not unlike nerves, which we generally call the olfactory organs. 94



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them