Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

In what places the suture around the cuneiform bone occurs

First, the line [synchondrosis spheno-occipitalis] common to the occiput and the cuneiform bone is visible both on the outside (n, n in figure 5) and the inside (P in figure 6). Likewise the portion of the suture extending from this line obliquely upward to the hollows of the temples as far as the anterior part of the squamous agglutinations is visible on the inside (from P through S, 81 S in figure 6) [sutura occipito-mastoidea] and the outside (from n through a, a to A in figure 5, from a, a to H in figures 3 and 4); it [sutura sphenosquamosa?] is common to the temporal bones and the cuneiform [os sphenoidale, ala major], and resembles a true suture. 82 The part that travels forward from here to the ends of the coronal suture resembles the squamous agglutination [sutura coronalis] common to the vertex [os parietale] and the cuneiform bone. The portion running from the ends of the coronal suture to the bones [os zygomaticum] that make up the outer angles of the eye sockets also resembles a squamous agglutination [sutura sphenofrontalis] and is common to the frontal bone and the cuneiform bone [ala major]. The interval and course of this suture that resembles a squamous agglutination is higher on the outside than inside the skull (compare figs. 3 and 4 with 6) to the same degree as the cuneiform bone is beveled like a scale where it is joined to the frontal and vertex bones. The same thing happens in the connection of the temporal bones with the vertex [os parietale]; the squamous agglutinations of these bones seem to run up much higher on the outside than on the inside, where the brain is. 83 Also, the part (from b through d to e in figs. 3 and 4) of the suture [sutura sphenosquamosa] around the cuneiform bone which is carried downward through the hollows [fossae infratemporales et temporales] of the temples is not seen inside the skull but only in the hollows of the temples and the eye sockets (Q in fig. 1, ch. 9) in their external angles. 84 This interval of suture [fissura pterygomaxillaris et fossa pterygopalatina] separates the cuneiform bone from the bones in the external angles of the eyes. The section of the suture which we are now discussing (e in figures 3, 4, 5), running forward near the back [tuber maxillae] of the innermost tooth [dens molaris III], is visible on the outside and in the nasal cavity [choana]; it is common to the cuneiform bone [os sphenoidale, processus pterygoideus, lamina lateralis] and the largest bones of the upper maxilla on either side. The portion of this suture visible in the upper part of the nasal cavity is seen better on the inside (Y on the left [right] side of L in figure 6) than on the outside (q, q in figure 5) of the skull, joining the cuneiform bone [jugum sphenoidale] with that which we said was perforated like a seive [lamina cribrosa ossis ethmoidalis]. Inside the skull, not only is the section of the present suture common to that bone and the cuneiform bone [synchondrosis spheno-ethmoidalis] obvious, but to this section another portion of the same suture [sutura sphenofrontalis] (Y on the right [left] side of L in figure 6) presents itself on both sides; this is believed to lie between the cuneiform and the frontal bone; it is clearly seen in the root of the eye socket (S, T of figure 1, chapter 9) near its more prominent region. If you closely examine the eye sockets (which the Greeks call ko/gxoi 85 ) you will observe that their root (N in figure 1, chapter 9) 86 and a large portion of their outer side near the inside is made up of the cuneiform bone. So you will learn if you consider such things in the fabric of man worth looking into and are taken with things that have little to do with applied skill but show the marvellous industry of the great Creator, and without doubt were closely studied by the ancient professors of anatomy.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them