Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

The edge of the cuneiform bone

When these ends reach a point near the foramina [choanae] of the nostrils that open into the mouth cavity, they are joined together by a transverse line [synchondrosis spheno-occipitalis] (n, n, in figure 5, P in figure 6) which can properly be called neither a suture nor a harmonia but should by all means be considered a symphysis 77 or fusion. In children it is filled with cartilage in the same way as a union of bone and epiphysis is seen in them, while in older persons the line is entirely hidden just as in those of advanced age. 78 In whatever form, this line is common to the occiput and the cuneiform bone. From here, a suture [sutura sphenosquamosa] runs laterally on both sides (in figure 5, from n through o and p on the right side, on the left through a and a to A; in figures 3 and 4, through a, a to H) through the hollows [fossae temporalis et infratemporalis] of the temples upward in an oblique curve towards the anterior part (from H to A in figs. 3, 4) of the squamous agglutinations. When the suture reaches that point (because it is at a notable distance from the end of the coronal suture in the hollow of the temple), it [sutura sphenoparietalis] runs forward and slightly downward to the ends of the coronal suture. From here it [sutura sphenofrontalis] moves downward again for a while (from A to b in figs. 3, 4) until it reaches the bone [os zygomaticum] of the upper maxilla, which will be explained to be the outer angle [margo supraorbitalis] of the eye socket [cavitas orbitale]. From here it proceeds down through the hollows of the temples to the posterior side of the innermost teeth [dentes molares], and goes transversely through the entire nasal cavity (q, q in fig. 5). 79 This suture, extending in this way from the transverse line [synchondrosis spheno-occipitalis] which we have said joins the ends of the lambdoid suture [synchondrosis sphenopetrosa] upward to the hollows of the temples, and downward again as far as


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the palate [os palatinum, lamina horizontalis] on either side as described, surrounds the cuneiform bone on the outside. On the inside, in the skull cavity (following P, S, S, Y, and Y in fig. 6) the cuneiform bone also ends at this suture; 80 the circumference of this bone is easier to find here than on the outside if one only keeps careful track of the suture’s course, since it presents itself here and there in many places.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them