Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them

The scaly seams of the temples

Now we direct our account to the remaining seams of the head. First, there are two lines (F in figures 3 and 4, [sutura squamosa] L L [sutura occipitomastoidea] in figure 6) more or less equidistant from the sagittal suture, extending lengthwise on each side above the ears. They begin (C to G in figures 3 and 4) [sutura parietomastoidea] from the lowest point of the lambdoid suture where it is near the lower parts of the occiput and no longer looks very much like a suture. From this point the lines run more or less straight and soon after move upwards (from G through F [sutura squamosa] and H to A [sutura sphenoparietalis] in figures 3 and 4) and extend in something like a semicircle to the end of the coronal suture. They consist mostly of two bones resting upon each other, and connected; not by a suture, but the vertex [os parietale] (I in figure 3, K in figure 4) 69 as it descends gradually becomes narrow like a scale and goes in under the bone ascending from the ears below (N in figures 1 and 4) 70 which is likewise thinned like a scale. Both bones assume a similar roughness at the point where they meet. For this reason neither Hippocrates nor any of those who have carefully studied the fabric of the body has deigned to name these sutures, but from their resemblance to a scale anatomists have called them lepidoeidh= proskollh/mata, that is, squamous agglutinations [sutura squamosa, sutura spheno- parietalis]. 71



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 6 On the Eight Bones of the Head and the Sutures Connecting Them