Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 5 The Structure of the Head: Why It Is Shaped As It Is, and How Many Configurations It Has

The natural shape of the head 18

Now the skull (omitting for now the temporal muscles, the connection of the head upon the vertebrae of the neck, and the round shape most suitable of all for constantly repelling injuries) not wrongfully borrows the shape of the cerebrum 19 (first figures of Bk. 7), whose container and defense it must be — the shape of a sphere slightly depressed in front on both sides [fossa temporalis]. For since the cerebellum is placed below the posterior portion of the cerebrum [fossa cranialis posterior] and the dorsal medulla comes down from the head there, and since the processes [nervus opticus, bulbus et tractus olfactorius] 20 grow from the forward part of the cerebrum toward the eyes and the seats of the organs of smell [os ethmoidale, lamina et foramina cribrosa], the cerebrum fittingly resembles an elongated sphere. This is why a skull which is arranged according to nature (figure 1 and most of the figures in chapter 6) is constructed for the most part in the shape of an oblong sphere, having a more prominent, elongated anterior and posterior portion.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 5 The Structure of the Head: Why It Is Shaped As It Is, and How Many Configurations It Has