Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 4 On the Structural Relationships of Bones

a)/rqron, joint. Visible motions: dia/rqrwsij

Now in the first place, there is the natural arrangement of bones for the sake of voluntary motion, called by the Greeks a)/rqrwsij and a)/rqron, by us articulation and joint. In fact, the way this motion works is not the same in all joints, since some motions are evident, and all can see them: no one fails to perceive the head being moved above the neck [articulatio atlanto-occipitalis], the femur in the hip bone, the hand on the forearm, and, in addition to countless joints, the fingers themselves [articulationes metacarpophalangeales et interphalangeales]. 16 This type of articulation, showing visible motion, is called dia/rqrwsij, as if the dearticulation were loose. Likewise Hippocrates called it a)pa/rqrwsij, so to speak an “abarticulation” 17 or loose articulation.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 4 On the Structural Relationships of Bones