Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified

Types of cavity

Besides the fact that some are cut in deeply and others only on the surface, some are round and spherical, like the cavity of the hip bone that receives the head of the femur, and the cavities of the finger bones into which the postbrachial bones are articulated. Others are oblong, like the cavity [facies articularis carpalis] of the radius (x, z, y in figure 8, Chapter 24) that receives the carpus, and the cavities [facies articulares superiores] of the first vertebra that take the capitula [condyli occipitales] of the occipital bone; in this category are also placed the cavities [fossae mandibulares] of the upper maxilla that admit the lower maxilla [mandibula]. Others are twin, like the cavities [condylus medialis, c. lateralis] of the tibia into which are placed the lower heads [condylus medialis, c. lateralis] of the femur; most cavities of the digital bones (K in figure 2, Chapter 27) are also considered twins. 63 Others resemble pulleys [trochleae] or small sheaves, like the depression [fossae olecrani, coronoidea, radialis] of the humerus that admits the ulna (K, L, M in figures 1 and 2, Chapter 23). Others resemble the letter C, like the cavity of the ulna (E, C, D in figure 1, Chapter 24) [incisura trochlearis, olecranon, processus coronoideus] which the humerus enters.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified