Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified

Tra/xhloj, a)uxh/n: neck, cervix

Latin writers call tra/xhloj and au)xh/n the neck and cervix, meaning by these words the part of the bone which corresponds to our neck. The neck or cervix is a thin process of a bone whose end thickens into a head. Such necks are nowhere seen quite as well as they are in the femur (h, h, in figures A and B) [collum femoris] next to the very elevated head that is articulated into the hip. In the lower maxilla such a conspicuous neck presents itself (i in figure C) [collum mandibulare] that we know anatomists often use the term “head of the neck of the lower maxilla.” In the talus also a cervix appears (k in the foot) [collum tali], visible before its rounded head which is articulated into the navicular bone. In addition to these the metatarsal and metacarpal bones show necks (l, l in the foot) where they are articulated with the digits. In other bones they are not as clearly seen. Sometimes, not only are thinner parts of bones that swell out into heads called necks, but we also use the term for thin processes that become thicker and form a depression into which another bone articulates. If this is seen anywhere, it is certainly clearest in the scapula, whose narrower part [collum scapulae](C, D in figure 1 and 2, Chapter 21), located before the cavity [cavitas glenoidalis] to which the humerus is articulated, has also gotten the name neck from professors of anatomy. 58



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified