Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified

The korw/nh or korwni/j is called by some translators cornix, crow. 43 The ancient Greeks meant by this word the acute process in bones which they compared to the horn of a bow and the notch where the bowstring lies. One of this kind is on either side of the lower maxilla [processus coronoideus] (T in figure C and A, B in the 6th table of muscles); the tendon of the temporal muscle is inserted into it. Another is seen in the temporal bone [processus mastoideus] (k in figures 4 and 5, Chapter 6); people compare it to the nipples on breasts. There is another [processus styloideus] (i in the same figures) on the same bone that is compared to the spur of a cock or a writing stylus.


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Galen seems to have used this word not only for acute processes suited for the origin and insertion of muscles, but also for a number of heads of bones which enter depressions in other bones for the sake of articulation. More than once he applied this name to the small heads of the occipital bone [condylus occipitalis] (figures 5 and 6, Chapter 11 [sic: 7]) which are articulated to the ends of the first cervical vertebra, though in fact, particularly in humans, they by no means deserve to be called a sharp process. 44



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified