Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified

The epiphyses are not covers of the cavities containing marrow

This happens in such a way that Galen reported the epiphyses to be covers of the cavities containing marrow, 26 as if the pores of the epiphyses contained no marrow, 27 and as if there were no epiphysis on a great number of bones lacking cavities containing marrow unmixed with bony fibers. But in fact, in the broad bones [ossa ilii] that are attached to the sides of the sacrum, such a cavity is nowhere present; nevertheless, an epiphysis [tuberculum iliacum] (N, N in figure D) grows on the entire spine of the ilium, just as it does on the entire lower area [tuber ischiadicum] of the hip bone. Moreover, the scapulae are almost nowhere medullary (see X, Y, E, and K in Ch. 21, figs. 1 and 2) but have four epiphyses: two at its base, one at the point of the scapula’s inner process [p. coracoideus], and a fourth [acromion], which is unusually constructed, near the shoulder top. 28 Finally, the back vertebrae lack this kind of cavity, but have epiphyses [facies intervertebrales] above and below (A, B, etc. in figure 1 and 2, Chapter 17); in fact not only do the vertebrae [bodies] have epiphyses [processes], but the epiphyses are connected to the tips of the transverse processes and spines of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. The vertebral epiphysis is also joined to the base [collum costae] of the ribs, even though the bone of the ribs has no large cavity containing marrow.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 3 Names by which the Parts and Surfaces of Bones are Identified