Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 2 The Nature, Use, and Varieties of Cartilage

Its use, similar to the ordinary use of bones

Its use is extremely varied. In the first place it performs the same function as bone, when it acts as a support to which neighboring parts are attached and stabilized. The cartilages of which the larynx is made, for example, elegantly perform the functions of bones: certain muscles are inserted into them, and several originate from them. Moreover, these cartilages form the larynx just as we see the houses of rustics are made of beams before thatching, tiles, and clay are applied to them. In fact, if you stripped bones and cartilages of their flesh and then joined them together, you would compare them to nothing more closely than the framework of huts when they are first erected and not yet covered with branches and earth. 2 In the same way, cartilages take the place of bones when they are placed where there is no bone and muscles are inserted in them. This happens in the eyelids and the nose. In the edges of the eyelids, there are long cartilages [tarsus superior et inferior] into which are inserted the muscles that move the eyelids [m.orbicularis oculi]. In addition to these, the alae of the nose are made of cartilages that take the insertions of muscles [m. nasalis, m. levator labii superioris alaeque nasi] exactly as bones. Indeed, those cartilages of the alae, 3 together with other cartilages growing out of the bones of the nose, 4 nicely support the apex of the nose just as if they were bone, and elevate it.



Book One -- The things that sustain and support the entire body, and what braces and attaches them all. [the bones and the ligaments that interconnect them] | Chapter 2 The Nature, Use, and Varieties of Cartilage